Jun 13, 2021  
2021-2022 Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Catalog

Literature and Languages Department


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Why study Literature and Languages? The Literature and Languages Department includes four emphases: literature, writing, language, and preparation for teaching at the middle school, high school, or college levels. Study of those emphases challenges our students and provides them the opportunity to develop both personally and professionally.    

How does this happen? Out students read a diversity of texts. They learn to analyze carefully. They become effective writers and speakers. They develop into life-long learners. And this development may take place anywhere on the planet. The undergraduate and graduate English degree programs can be completed entirely online through our innovative hyflex teaching and learning model. We have students (and graduates) all over the United States and in many other countries. Some of our graduates teach in high schools and middle schools. Others serve as college or university professors. Some work as editors, grant writers, or technical writers. Some own or work for businesses; others operate or work for non-profits or in government.

The Literature and Language Department serves as home to both the English Undergraduate and Graduate Programs and the World Languages Programs. We offer undergraduate majors in English, English Language Arts (5-12 Certification), minors in Literature, Writing, and Spanish, graduate Master of Arts and Master in Teaching (Secondary English) degrees, and graduate certificates in English Language Arts, Literature, and Writing.

The Literature and Languages Department serves the university as a whole by providing the English Composition and World Languages General Univeristy Requirements. The department also supports the “W” course requirement (see “Special Programs”)and provides specialized classes in writing, linguistics, and literature for other departments and programs.

Mission Statement

The Literature and Languages Department strives to inspire students to bring to the world community original perspectives, innovative strategies, and knowledge that will contribute to the intellectual and creative spirit of our collective human experience. We aim to provide access to a high-quality education to students whose circumstances might otherwise limit those opportunities.

B.A. and M.A. Program Goals and Objectives

Our primary goal at both undergraduate and graduate levels is to produce graduates qualified (as appropriate) with English/Language Arts Endorsement; and/or credentials to instruct middle school, high school, or college-level courses in writing, language, and literature; and/or preparation to gain admission to graduate programs in English or related fields. In order to do so, graduates must develop the following knowledge, skills, and dispositions:

 

1. Understand the history, development, and structure of the English language and know how that theory relates in practice to the teaching and learning of language, both spoken and written. Demonstrate knowledge and application of the following:

           a. Phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics

           b. Sociolinguistics

           c. Language acquisition

           d. Teaching and learning languages

2. Be aware of contemporary approaches to the composition process and able to demonstrate that knowledge in a variety of genres as well as connecting that knowledge and those skills to the pedagogy of writing. Demonstrate knowledge and application of the following:

           a. Composition theories

           b. Writing across variety of genres, both academic and non-academic

           c. Teaching composition

3. Know and appreciate the diversity of voices in both Anglo-American and global literature as well as being able to apply classical and contemporary critical approaches to illuminate texts for colleagues and students. Demonstrate knowledge and application of the following:

           a. History of literature and its historical context, both in the American tradition and globally

           b. Diverse literatures in both the American and global traditions

           c. Use of Critical Approaches in both scholarship and teaching

           d. Teaching literature

4. Demonstrate strong research, writing, and presentation skills through the production of works suitable for presentation and publication as appropriate to the student’s concentration, including the Bachelor’s Thesis or Master’s Thesis. Demonstrate knowledge and application of the following:

           a. Library Research skills

          b. Field Research skills

          c. Presentation skills

What jobs are available for English graduates?

Some of these will require additional study at the graduate level:

  • Teacher

  • Editor/copywriter

  • Journalist

  • Writer

  • Lawyer

  • Librarian

  • Public relations specialist

  • Nonprofit director

  • Researcher

  • Grant writer

  • Professional fund-raiser

  • Translator

  • Museum specialist

  • Archives management

  • Federal, state, and local official

English Undergraduate Program:

The English Undergraduate Program offers several degree paths for students seeking to study literature, language, and writing. Students may pursue a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in English Language and Literature. Students may also pursue a B.A. in English Language Arts (which includes a WA Initial Teaching Certificate and a WA English Language Arts 5-12 Endorsement). Finally, students may pursue an English Minor as a Generalist or in Literature or Writing. We advise students to consider carefully which path would best suit their goals.

English Graduate Program:

The English Graduate Program offers several degree paths for students seeking additional study literature, language, and writing. Students may pursue a Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in Multicultural English Literature and Language with additional coursework in a more specialized area of English (“concentration”). Students may also pursue a Certificate in English Language Arts (which includes a stand-alone WA English Language Arts 5-12 Endorsement for students who already hold a Teaching Certificate) or a Certificate in Literature or Writing. Finally, students may combine work in Education and English to pursue a Master in Teaching (M.I.T) degree to earn both a WA Residency Teaching Certificate and a WA English Language Arts 5-12 endorsement. We advise students to consider carefully which path would best suit their goals.

World Languages

The Heritage world language courses regularly include Sahaptin and Spanish. Sometimes other languages such as American Sign Language, French, and Latin.

In Spanish, a dual-track program is offered that allows non-native Spanish speakers and native Spanish speakers to gain proficiency with structure, form, history, and culture of the Spanish language and provides the ability to converse in a variety of academic and non-academic settings. An emphasis is placed on attaining fluency in Spanish. Non-Spanish speakers are requested to enroll in the SPAN 101 - SPAN 102 sequence while Spanish- speaking students are requested to enroll in the SPAN 205 - SPAN 206 sequence.

 

 

 

Programs

    Bachelor of ArtsMaster in TeachingMaster of ArtsCertificateMinor

    Courses

      American Sign LanguageEnglishPage: 1 | 2

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